Here is something on the lighter side about How To Deodorize Subprime Stench

The World Economic Forum is targeting the noses of the 2,400 global leaders at the group’s 38th annual meeting next week in Davos, Switzerland. Perfume-pumping machines in the main conference halls will spray eight specially created fragrances such as Artemis and Lavender Fields to relieve any unpleasant aromas that settle on delegates, who include Chevron Corp. Chief Executive Officer David O’Reilly, JPMorgan Chase & Co. CEO Jamie Dimon and former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

The creator of eau de Davos is Christophe Laudamiel, a French chemist who is senior perfumer at International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. The New York-based company blends aromas for fashion houses such as Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. and makes the smell that makes a new car smell like a new car.

The Mission

Laudamiel’s mission is to create and circulate aromatic moments that evoke the intimacy of the meeting, while helping delegates solve global calamities against a backdrop of crisis. Paramount among what the WEF’s 2008 program portrays as a global “contagion” is the fallout from lenders marking down more than $80 billion after a surge in U.S. subprime mortgage defaults.

“The aroma of subprime is an interesting concept, and that’s one of the reasons I’m fragrancing the rooms,” Laudamiel says. “I want my perfumes to overcome the gloom.”

Nasal Vigilance

“The global economy smells and perfume won’t make it go away,” McKee says. “The collapse of the U.S. dollar is a great big green cabbage that has been in the fridge too long: You open the door and still don’t know where the stench is coming from.

Subprime and the credit crisis? How about the tang of dirty water with overtones of rotten timber scented with wood lice as it drains down a moldy sink?”

Mike “Mish” Shedlock
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