In the wake of Trump’s seven-nation travel ban that left legal residents stranded overseas or detained in US airports, came a flurry of protests, judicial rulings, and actions including a reversal by the White House.

Judge Blocks Parts of Trump’s Refugee Ban

The Wall Street Journal reports Judge Blocks Parts of Trump’s Refugee Ban.

U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly issued the stay after the American Civil Liberties Union and other civil-liberties advocates asked for an emergency motion temporarily stopping U.S. authorities from forcing incoming refugees to return to their home countries.

At a court hearing Saturday night, the judge said these deportations could cause “irreparable injury” to the refugees who face threats in their home countries or have family members already living here.

After Judge Donnelly’s ruling, federal judges in Alexandria, Va., Seattle and Boston issued similar rulings barring the removal of detained individuals who had filed lawsuits in their jurisdictions. In Boston, U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs took it one step further and said no one arriving in Logan International Airport could be detained solely on the basis of the executive order.

Protesters Gather at Airports

The Wall Street Journal reports Protesters Gather at Airports to Denounce Refugee Ban.

Protesters gathered at major airports across the country on Saturday to denounce President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting entry by some foreign nationals to the U.S.

Hundreds of people gathered at John F. Kennedy International Airport to protest the detention of two Iraqi men as a result of the refugee ban, in a demonstration that grew in strength as word spread of more travelers being held or prevented from entering the U.S.

The protests extended to other airports across the nation. A crowd of at least 400 protesters blocked a street in front of the San Francisco International Airport, while Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport was the site of a demonstration drawing at least 1,000 protesters.

Green-Card Holders Are Exempt from Travel Restrictions

In a sudden reversal, no doubt forced by judicial actions and protests, Trump reversed course. The White House now says Green-Card Holders Are Exempt from Travel Restrictions.

A senior White House official said on Sunday that foreign nationals with legal permanent residence in the U.S. wouldn’t be affected by Friday’s executive order restricting entry of visa holders and refugees from seven Muslim-majority countries.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said green-card holders from the countries designated in the order could face extra scrutiny at U.S. points of entry under immigration officials’ existing authority, but said the order “doesn’t affect them.” Green-card holders are foreign nationals permitted to live permanently in the U.S.

“As far as green card holders moving forward, it doesn’t affect them,” he said on ABC News.

On CBS he said, “The executive order itself is not placing further burdens on people that hold green cards.”

Small Price Theory

“The upside being the greater protection of our borders, of our people, it is a small price to pay,” said senior White House adviser Kellyanne Conway on Fox News Sunday. “This whole idea that they’re being separated and ripped from their families, it’s temporary.”

Mish Positions

  1. Trump’s Ban: Poorly thought out and implemented.
  2. Protests: Reasonable. People are allowed to protest. Some did.
  3. Judicial Rulings: Correct.
  4. White House Reversal: Too late, damage was done.
  5. Small Price Theory: Idiotic. It’s always a “small price” when someone else has to pay. US drone policy is under the same asinine theory. It allows the US to drop bombs in seven countries, at least one of which is an ally. We have killed or injured thousands of innocent men, women, and children allegedly to protect the US, but always making more enemies than we kill. The US has been involved and remains involved in numerous illegal and unconstitutional undeclared war actions.

If it’s unconstitutional, it’s not a small price by definition.

For further discussion please see “Small Price to Pay”.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock